EXAMPLES OF TYPE THAT WORKS

Texas HS, Texarkana, TX-Type package

THE TIGER, TEXAS HIGH SCHOOL, TEXARKANA, TX
  • Texas HS, Texarkana, TX-Type packagesThe spread combines a serif font with a sans serif. The serif is used sparingly as a contrasting display type, both in size and in color. The main word head is in the serif font and the rest of the headline is the sans serif font.
  • The designer uses the same serif font — and in the same color — for the large initial letter that acts as a reader entry point on the copy.
  • The sans serif font in a bold weight was used for the secondary headline, the secondary package quote and the caption lead ins.
  • Notice how all the copy and captions are set in the sans serif font and they are not justified. This gives the design a more casual, contemporary look, more like a magazine. Serifs and justified type give designs a more formal, traditional look.
  • Look how the designer echoed the style of the primary headline for the secondary quote package. It uses the same combination of serif and sans serif plus the same colors as the main headline. But it’s smaller, signaling to the reader that it is less important than the main headline/copy package.

Temple HS, Temple City, CA-Type package

TEMPLAR, TEMPLE CITY HIGH SCHOOL, TEMPLE CITY, CA
  • Temple HS, Temple City, CA-Type packagesThis spread is a good example of a unified look through the use of one font. Everything is set in the same sans serif font. The designer uses color, capitalization and italic type to give the spread variety.
  • Check out how the designer created a similar look for the primary headline package and for the two secondary packages by using the same capitalization pattern and the same colors. Using all capitals means not having to worry about working around ascenders and descenders. The use of this thin sans serif keeps the all-capitals pattern from being too overpowering.
  • Look at how the spacing of the display type also gives the packages a unified design. In each of the headline packages, there is little or no leading and the words are arranged without spaces. Color becomes the way the readers can distinguish between words.
  • This spread is also a good example of visual hierarchy. The most important headline, the one packaged with the main copy, is the largest. The second most important, LOOK (in the lower left corner), is smaller and echoes the primary headline visually and verbally. The HOW DO I LOOK package is smaller still, so it’s even less important. The least important, DISCOVER, is the smallest headline and, because the main word is a gray screen, it emphasizes its place at the bottom of the hierarchy. Again it echoes the primary headline both visually and verbally.
  • The secondary headline is extended to provide a clear, lengthy overview of the story. It’s set off from the copy by alignment, plus it’s a larger point size, a heavier weight and italicized.
  • It’s easy to distinguish the captions for the main photos from the secondary HOW DO I LOOK package because the main captions have more leading.