10 TIPS FOR WRITING COPY

These tips can help you write effective yearbook copy.

1. KEEP SENTENCES SHORT AND SENTENCE STRUCTURE SIMPLE.

People don’t read long sentences. We can’t change them. Use strong verbs and strong nouns. Drop all the excess.

2. SHORTER PARAGRAPHS ARE MORE INVITING.

People also don’t read long paragraphs. One thought per paragraph. One quote per paragraph. A paragraph can be one sentence. Deep breath English lit teachers.

3. AVOID VAGUE WORDS.

Words such as “many,” “a lot,” “several,” “some” or “a few” waste space. Find the specific or drop the thought.

4. BE SPECIFIC AND ACCURATE.

You are reporting events. It matters that you say the team had a 7-3 season more than it matters that the team had a winning season.

5. KEEP YOUR READER’S ATTENTION.

Take a break from traditional copy every once and a while. Give them a treat with fact boxes, Q and A, bio boxes, timelines, quote collections and public opinion polls.

6. AVOID USING THE PHRASE “THIS YEAR” AND THE NAME OF YOUR SCHOOL.

They know the year and they know the school. That’s the point of the book. Don’t mention them.

7. WRITE COPY IN THE THIRD PERSON.

You’re an objective reporter. Make it sound that way. “He,” “she,” “it” and “they” are your pronouns. Exceptions exist, but they are few.

8. DO NOT EDITORIALIZE.

Quotes are the most important part of the story. So are sources. Have at least three sources per story. Never make an opinion statement that cannot be attributed to a specific source. Be particularly careful with opinionated adjectives and adverbs.

9. FOLLOW YOUR STAFF’S STYLEGUIDE.

List the rules for using names, titles and figures as well as the rules for punctuation and capitalization. Associated Press knows all. Consult the pros when you are lost.

10. USE THE LANGUAGE OF YOUR READERS.

Write the way you speak. This isn’t a term paper people. But, avoid slang and obey basic grammar rules.

NEED AN IDEA FOR
A STORY?

Good yearbook stories feature content students will want to remember, but coming up with ideas for those stories isn’t always easy. We have provided some potential story ideas to help build your yearbook content.

STUDENT LIFE
  • Amusement parks
  • Elections/political involvement
ACADEMICS
  • Foreign exchange program
  • Scholarships
CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS
  • Interaction with local community
  • Off-campus trips
SPORTS
  • College recruiting
  • Crosstown rivals
UNDERCLASS
  • Practical jokes
  • Siblings: at same school, twins
SENIORS
  • College: applying – time & money involved,
    essays, college visits

BLOG SIGN-UP

Timely topics written for advisers and editors from all kinds of books and administrators working to build strong school communities. No need to subscribe if you’re a current Herff Jones customer, you’re already on the list!

  • Enter your full school name for company.
  • Help us personalize the content you'll receive.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.